Exposure to Violent Video Games and Aggression July 24, 2018 – Posted in: Essay Help Online, Free Essay Help Online

Exposure to Violent Video Games and Aggression

Thomas, K. D., & Levent, R. F. (2012). Does the endorsement of traditional masculinity ideology moderate the relationship between exposure to violent video games and aggression?. The Journal of Men’s Studies. (Exposure to Violent Video Games and Aggression)

The research criticizes the theory that suggests that there is a correlation between prolonged exposure to violent video games and aggression. The primary variables in the study included masculine aggression and the amount of time spent on video games. The specific aim of the research is to undertake a cross-sectional study of the different participants including the males to determine the frequency of their vulnerability to violent behavior. Violent video games act as the independent variable while aggression represents the dependent variable. The authors of the article sought to demonstrate their perspectives by outlining four hypotheses. The first one concerned projecting a direct connection between exposure to violent video games and human aggression. The second hypothesis was based on the articulation of masculine norms which was also projected to associate with increased exposure to video games positively. The third premise was traditional stereotyped regarding how the male gender contributed to aggressive behavior. It was found that on different accounts that there is a substantial theory to support the claim that violence is directly linked to exposure to video games.

The study critiqued a total of 168 participants from different categories. A large proportion of the participants were European Americans, followed by the African Americans. The research also incorporated the heterosexuals, accounting for up 10% of the population. Other than the racial background, the study accommodated relationship statuses by integrating those who were dating, in exclusive relationships, the married and the engaged couples. The population was characteristics of different educational levels including high school and undergraduate. It also reflected their economic backgrounds where most of the students were middle class, with around 17% in the upper class. There were few numbers of students from the lower class. Regarding religion, most of the participants were Christians, with a fair number of Atheists.

Hypothesis testing employed different statistical techniques. Tests were conducted on four primary areas subject to the study. The specific measurements used a Demographic Questionnaire (DV), Male Role Norms Inventory-Revised (MRNI-R) statistic, Exposure to Violent Videogames Measures (EVVM) and The Aggression Questionnaire (AQ).

The experimentation of the data employed different measures aimed at enhancing the accuracy of the findings. The Demographic Questionnaire came in handy in providing critical information regarding issues such as race, gender, and religious orientations. The assessment of masculinity employed a 7-point Likert type scale which helped to understand aggression in men. The participants were allowed to play as many violent videos games as possible, then describe their level of interest in specific games. They were then asked a series of questions regarding hostility, verbal aggression, and anger.

The results of the study found aligned with all the predefined hypotheses.  Test measure consisted of a direct relationship between aggression and prolonged exposure to violent video games. The relationship was the same for stereotypical behavior in males which is an incentive to violence. One of the major limitations of the study included the lack of randomized data regarding the distribution of the population. It was also difficult to study the nature of aggression in men, particularly those who had previously engaged in acts of violence. It made it difficult to achieve exclusivity of the study.  However, given the high number of participants, it was fair to suggest the findings were reliable.

References

Thomas, K. D., & Levent, R. F. (2012). Does the endorsement of traditional masculinity ideology moderate the relationship between exposure to violent video games and aggression?. The Journal of Men’s Studies.